New To My Fiber Stash and Wheel Collection

As our weather gradually becomes much cooler I find myself gravitating to fall colors, especially when it comes to fiber for spinning.

I recently purchased this beautiful Corridale in the color Sleepy Hollow from one of my all time favorite Indy Dyers, Dedri of Quillin Fiber Arts.



From Dedri’s listing:
Corriedale Combed Top Roving in the Sleepy Hollow Colorway. Gray and Orange with some white pops possible.  Works well for needle felting and hand spinning. Does not wet felt particularly well. May not be considered next to skin soft by some. Good for projects like fingerless gloves and hats. This is an excellent wool for beginning spinners. 
These three beautiful bumps of fiber are destined for a shawl.  I love spinning for shawls, especially if my intention is to spin worsted to bulky weight.  For this particular fiber, I am leaning towards heavy worsted to light bulky, and to spin for either Brookdale by Chrissy Graham  , Wolf Moon by Mindy Wilkes  or The Lonely Tree Shawl by Sylvia McFadden.  I want designs that give me just enough interest but at the same time provides simplicity to show off my hand-spun

Also bought the rest of the fiber I need for my intentional spinning project from Abundant Earth Fiber.  I truly love the rustic nature of this fiber and love the ease of spinning it into three ply yarn.  In the photo below, the Walnut and the Skylight colors will be the main colors, with the Citrine, Blood Orange and Forage as the contrasting colors.



I am hoping to focus on spinning once I finish my knitting projects.  I truly want to concentrate on my handspun projects for the rest of the year, but like all fiber artists and multi-crafters I often wonder off into new adventures and projects.

And new to my wheel collection is a beautiful Danker wheel that I picked up in pristine condition.


There is not alot of information out there on the Danker other than it was made by the Danker 
Clock Company.  I did find this from the Wool Merchants Daughter blog post from 2012 though and 
heard the same thing from Heavenly of Heavenly Knitchet.

This is a Daneker, oft maligned by handspinners as being a bad attempt at reproducing a Colonial saxony wheel. Made by the Daneker Furniture Company in Maryland during the 1960s, this wheel was an effort to accurately reproduce a working model of a flax wheel. Unfortunately, the makers do not seem to have consulted any handspinners and so did make some errors. Like use brass for the flyer shaft, bobbin screw inset, and even the wheel axle. The brass does not wear well and so these parts tend to show the stress they are subjected to. The screw tensioning knob is also problematic, in that it is not long enough. However, construction flaws taken into consideration, the Danekers DO spin, and spin well....

I seem to have a fondness for antique and vintage wheels just as much as I do for sewing machines!

Until next time, be creative!



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